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When it comes to deck coatings, my philosophy has been that education makes better consumers. When a consumer has full disclosure and the right information, they can make smart decisions. To that end, I have written several articles to help educate our clients and website visitors on the ins and out’s of maintaining, buying and reserving for waterproof deck coatings. It is my hope that you will take this information and use it to ferret out the information you need to know from contractors and manufacturers.
In the pursuit of bringing consumers educational articles and information from other alternative sources, I have searched the web for educational articles on deck coatings/waterproofing. In the page below you’ll find my articles listed and articles by other industry professionals. In the spirit of fair use, I have only posted excerpts from authors whose work is posted on other websites. A link to the authors website is provided in order for you to read the rest of the article. Let me know if you find a dead link!

READ BILL LEYS’ LATEST ARTICLE IN 

PROFESSIONAL DECK BUILDER MAGAZINE!

DEANNE S SAYSTHANK YOUR FOR POSTING INFORMATION TO EDUCATE HOMEOWNERS, DESIGNERS AND EVEN THOSE IN THE TRADE ON THE HOW AND WHY TO BUILD DECKS WITH QUALITY MATERIALS AND FOR DURABILITY.

 BEST PRACTICES BUILDING & WATERPROOFING ROOF DECKS”

Bill Leys' latest article gives builders and architects  the information they need to make good decisions!
Bill Leys’ latest article gives builders and architects
the information they need to make good decisions!
 

READ OUR AWARD WINNING ARTICLE!

SB-800 and It’s Effects on Decks and Their Warranties and Maintenance was published in Residential Contractor’s Summer 2007 issue and won the 2007 Editor’s Choice Award from CAI Greater Los Angeles.
“Bill Leys’ excellent article on decking gets the word out on how SB-800 puts the burden on associations to be alert to warranty stipulations and to properly maintain decks if they want their warranties to remain valid.” — Jacklyn Wolf, Focus Editor

Other Deck Articles by Bill Leys…

As Featured On Ezine ArticlesDeck Coatings and Their Care — Written for HOA’s, this article has detailed and information filled advice on maintenance, bidding tips and reserving for deck coating, along with suggested questions to ask when bidding. This article has appeared in the following magazines and web sites:


Deck Coatings and Their Care (Apartment Version) — Written for Income Producing Properties, this guide helps owners to maintain their decks, what to look for when replacing a coating and information on what to ask the contractors bidding your work. This article has appeared in the following magazines and web sites:


Saving Money With New Technology — This article discusses the Desert Crete decking system from Hill Brothers and it’s advantages for HOA’s. This article has appear in the following magazines and web sites:

  • 2005 Annual ECHO Seminar Program
  • August 2005 Issue of ECHOJournal
  • November/December 2005 Issue of CAI Channel Island Chapter’s – Channels of Communication

Articles Coming Soon…

Reserving For Deck Coatings — This article will discuss the ins and outs of reserving for the maintenance of your deck coatings and the ultimate replacement of the coatings 20-30 years down the road.

ARTICLES BY OTHER AUTHORS

Disclaimer/Notice Regarding Fair Use of Copyrighted Materials

I’m a big believer in education, so we do use some copyrighted materials from time to time, however, the law says we can, under certain instances, including purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright. Oh, not withstanding the provisions of sections 106 and 106A of course.

So here’s the legal puke to help cover us…

Some articles listed on this website may be copyrighted material, the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We make such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of construction, legal issues, manufacturer’s materials and technical information , etc. We believe this constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to the:Cornell Law Website. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond fair use, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.

By reading or subscribing to our website, you agree to use any information here for your own educational benefit and fair use. Happy reading!

I’ve collected links to articles written by other authors on the subject of waterproofing and deck coatings. Clicking these links will open a new window to another entities website. We are not responsible for these sites or the information they contain.
FRAMING

Smart Ways to Handle Capital-Project Change Orders and Save Money

Stephen Varone and Peter Varsalona are principals at Rand Engineering & Architecture.


WATERPROOF ROOFTOP DECKS & BALCONIES Or How to Keep Your Ceiling Dry When People Walk on Your Roof

by Jim Katen
This is a good slide show by Oregon based home inspector Jim Katen. He discusses the various types of decks and waterproofing. Take a look!





 


 


TILE ROOF DECKS

Article in September 1991 issue of Tile & Decorative Surfaces written by George N. Lavenberg, FCSI, CIC, Technical Director.
Editors Note-While some of the systems may not exist or have been changed, the premise remains the same. Low slope roof decks must have the proper flashings, waterproofing and be built to handle the maximum load intended or you risk failure of the deck system …read the excerpt below
“It’s only a roof deck!” Did you ever hear that statement? When and if you do, be prepared for problems, and very possibly big ones. Where roof decks and concerned, roof is the most important word. When it comes to keeping water out, how the roof deck is constructed is at least as important as the balance of the roof itself, since both must satisfy the same requirement to keep the rooms and equipment below them dry.
SOME BAD EXAMPLES
A roof deck was leaking badly. Upon investigation, it was found that the installation had been made using one of the methods described in the Handbook for Ceramic Tile Installation. Why, then, the leakage? The method selected was one involving a cleavage membrane, and it had been chosen even though some of the other methods contained in the Handbook called for awaterproof membrane. The purpose of the cleavage membrane, as you will recall, is to isolate the tile floor from the structure, not to serve as a waterproof membrane.
READ  GEORGE LAVENBERG’s WHOLE ARTICLE BY CLICKING ON THE TITLE ABOVE.  

 
The Florida Community Association Journal has published several excellent articles on deck waterproofing and related issues. I’ve compiled a listing of these below with links to the PDF documents at FLACJ’s website.
By Daniel Perez
Daniel Perez is a concrete restoration and waterproofing specialist for All-State Products Inc in Miami Fla. For more information visitwww.aspfla.com
 Whether underneath paver, a garden roof, or inside planters, a high build waterproofing system is critical to the protection of structural components and occupied building areas. As an owner or property manager, you may only be interested in the end result and not the application type, but there are many things to consider before making the final decision.  
READ ALL OF DANIEL’S ARTICLE BY CLICKING ON THE TITLE ABOVE.
By Peter Innes
Peter Innes is owner of Innes Communication in Saddle Brook NJ. Information for this article was submitted by Kemper Systems of Boca Raton FLA.
Community Associations are presented with a number of difficult decisions, and too often, the association members do not have enough information to make critical decisions that involve waterproofing. If you only look at competitive bids for the same type of waterproofing solution, then you’re really not looking at every available soloution. You’re only looking at cost when you should be looking at cost and performance.
READ ALL OF PETER’S ARTICLE BY CLICKING ON THE TITLE ABOVE.
By Robin Braden
Robin Braden is the purchasing and marketing manager for All-State Products with locations in Fort Meyers, Miami, Pompano, and West Palm Beach. For more information visit www.aspfla.com
Does your building have any water damage? Do you know what to look for?
Many associations do not realize the damage that water can cause; nor do they know what to look for. There are many tell-tale signs that your building reveals when water is causing damage. The good news is if after inspection, seepage is found, you can prevent further damage by stopping the leak. The following are areas that are susceptible to water damage and the signs to look for when inspecting them. 
READ ALL OF ROBIN’S ARTICLE BY CLICKING ON THE TITLE ABOVE.
BALCONY REPAIR-A Long Term Approach is Best
By Ashley Kizzire
Ashley Kizzire is employed with Structural Preservation Systems of Sarasota Florida.
A typical concrete balcony in Florida, constantly exposed to the harsh coastal elements, is a breeding ground for deterioration. As such, condominium owners and associations often find themselves in the middle of balcony repair projects. All to often though, a shortsighted approach to balcony restoration is taken, and only minimal repairfs are made one at a time. As a result, owners fail to realize the practical nad economic benefits of a more long-range approach to balcony repair.
READ ALL OF ASHLEY’S ARTICLE BY CLICKING ON THE TITLE ABOVE.
By Steve Poling
Steve Poling is the president of Matco Supply in St Petersburg Fla. He is the local sales rep for Evonik Industries. For more information, visitwww.protectosil.com
One of the most frustrating moments for a condominium owner is being hit wioth a major special assessment to repair balconies and walkways. Many times the “visual” damage seems minor-just a few pieces of concrete are popping up or some cracking in the concrete. 
The Florida DOT considers any reinforced stucture built within a half mile of saltwater to be in an “extremely aggressive corrosion envirnonment.” This is because chlorides (Or salt) orginating from these bodies of water are carried by airborne moisture, wind and rain onto the structures and, over time, migrate to the steel reinforcement inside. 
READ ALL OF STEVE’S ARTICLE BY CLICKING ON THE TITLE ABOVE.

By Dennis Hill
Dennis Hill is the Director of Corporate Development for Poma and Sons in Palm City FLA. For more information, visitwww.pomaonline.com
The pictures tell the story. Ugly rust stains drip over the concrete balcony, cracked and broken concrete and corroded railing posts are all to common sights in communites and high-rises in Florida…It is estimated that over $1 Billion a year is spent on restoration in Florida, although there are no firm figures on railing replacement as part of that restoration. 
READ ALL OF DENNIS’ ARTICLE BY CLICKING ON THE TITLE ABOVE.

By Joesph Sanders CMCA
Joseph Sanders is a senior association
manager in Northwest Florida. He has written several
articles of industry interest for
the Florida Community Association Journal.
On occasion, there comes a time when managers responsible for
operating a mid-rise or high-rise building have to deal with tragedy.
This type of tragedy is truly every high-rise manager’s worst
nightmare. That bad dream is someone falling from the building. This
may not happen to a high-rise manager in his or her entire career; yet it
may happen more than once. The chances or odds, if you will, of it occurring
are commensurate with the nature of what a high-rise building is.
Prevention is always the first item of consideration. Employees,
particularly maintenance and housekeeping, should
lways follow safety rules.when performing duties and tasks. This is especially true when performing
tasks, such as changing a light bulb or cleaning a window along a
common area walkway, in a mid-rise or high-rise structure. If said employees
find themselves above the balcony or walkway railing in the course
of their tasks, they should wear a safety harness. An extra measure of
safety is having another employee
with them to observe and assist.
READ THE REST OF THIS ARTICLE AT FLACJ by Clicking on the Title

Building Services Management Magazine
Articles From Building Services Management Magazine
 Infrared Thermography For Restoration
By jill Wagner
Jill H. Wagner is a freelance writer and consultant with more than 13 years of experience in a wide range of industries. She holds a Master of Arts in Marketing and Advertising from Emerson College, and can be reached at ‘; document.write( ‘‘ ); document.write( addy_text81344 ); document.write( ‘<\/a>’ ); //–>\n .
Mold, which can begin to grow within 24 hours after moisture seepage, has forced organizations to spend millions on environmental tests and structural restoration, adversely affecting their bottom lines.
From a health standpoint, exposure to mold can cause allergic reactions, asthma, and other serious respiratory issues for a building’s inhabitants, too.
The first step in eliminating mold is to quickly and accurately locate and remove all sources of moisture. Since some sources of moisture and areas where mold may potentially grow are impossible to see with the naked eye, infrared thermography is the ideal technology to use when inspecting buildings for restoration.
Infrared thermography is a fast and non-invasive technology that can accurately track down sources of moisture in the building envelope – even when hidden behind interior walls, within insulation, or in the ceiling. An infrared camera detects thermal anomalies by imaging the different temperatures of wet versus dry building materials. Thermal images produced by the infrared camera enable the thermographer to determine whether moisture or even mold may already be lurking.

Unique & Decorative Decks, Deck Railings, Deck Lighting Get Your #PatioEnvy #DeckEnvy On Here!

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