Plaza Decks

db-leaderboard-2

put-your-ad-here-leaderboard

Plaza deck’s present many obstacles to waterproofing correctly. Browse through our compiled articles and hopefully avoid these obstacles before faced with a problem.

ARTICLES BY OTHER AUTHORS

Disclaimer/Notice Regarding Fair Use of Copyrighted Materials

I’m a big believer in education, so I use some copyrighted materials on this site, however, the law says we can, under certain instances, including purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright. Oh, not withstanding the provisions of sections 106 and 106A of course.

So here’s the legal puke to help cover us…

Some articles listed on this website may be copyrighted material, the use of which has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We make such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of construction, legal issues, manufacturer’s materials and technical information , etc. We believe this constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to the:Cornell Law Website. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond fair use, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.

By reading or subscribing to our website, you agree to use any information here for your own educational benefit and fair use. Happy reading!

I’ve collected links to articles written by other authors on the subject of waterproofing and deck coatings. Clicking these links will open a new window to another entities website. We are not responsible for these sites or the information they contain.

Concepts for Plaza Deck Projects

FROM THE ROOFING CONSULTANT’S INSTITUTE’S WEBSITE
By Peter D’Antonio
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Peter D’Antonio has been with Sarnafil Roofing and Waterproofing Systems for more than 20 years in a variety of sales, marketing, and man agement positions. Mr. D’Antonio currently acts as the Waterproofing Manager and National Sales Manager of Educational Facilities at Sarnafil. An active RCI member since 1988, he has also served on the Board of Directors for the Sealant, Waterproofing, and Restoration Institute (SWRI), the Boston Chapter of CSI, and is currently on the Executive Committee of the US Department of Energy’s Rebuild America Program. Peter resides in New Hampshire. He can be reached at peter.d’ antonio@sarnafilus.com .
A number of excellent, definitive articles and papers has been presented in recent years on plaza deck waterproofing
systems and design. Many of these papers have focused on contrasting system types, material advantages, and recommended
standards. In most cases, these articles may be viewed as plaza deck waterproofing primers since they are based on both a generic material analysis and a general level of waterproofing experience. Despite advances in material technology and installation
experience, however, there unfortunately continues to be an increase in leaks, litigation, and premature replacement of plaza deck systems. Although it is easy for designers and manufacturers
to blame workmanship for most problems, certain safeguards
by all parties could be taken to forestall problems. This article is intended to review several important concepts that should be applicable to most deck waterproofing projects. The concepts are not original but are based on observations accumulated
from more than a thousand plaza deck applications, mostly rehab projects completed over the past 12 years.
Concept 1: One size does not fit all. The system from the last application may not be the best choice for the current project.
 READ THE REST OF PETER’S ARTICLE ON PLAZA DECKS BY CLICKING ON THE TITLE ABOVE.

 ANATOMY OF A PLAZA ROOF DECK

By Bart Mendel- Stonemark Construction
As Seen In FOCUS Magazine, CAI Greater
Los Angeles Chapter, May/June 2006.
HERE IS AN EXCERPT FROM BART’S ARTICLE
As time passes, and many residential complexes face their 20 th , 30 th or 40 th year, maintenance
issues change. In this article we will look at a plaza deck building system in order to understand
how it was originally constructed, expectations for its life expectancy, how to extend the life of
the system, and ultimately how and when to replace the waterproofing.
Many apartment complexes and associations are constructed with a structural concrete deck
above one or more levels of subterranean parking. Generally there are a number of separate
residential buildings built on top of the structural concrete deck. For the purpose of this article,
we are calling the area in between the buildings the plaza deck. This plaza deck is generally the
common area and is enriched with walkways, landscaping, planters, exterior lighting, and
sometimes amenities such as tennis courts, swimming pools or spas.
Plaza deck construction varies but generally the structural concrete portion of the assembly is
about 12” thick with two layers of steel reinforcement, one at the top and one at the bottom of the
pour. Rebar should have 2” concrete cover.
READ ALL OF BART’S ARTICLE AT Greater LA CAI’s WEBSITE BY CLICKING ON THE TITLE ABOVE. 

PLAZA WATERPROOFING BASIC’S

By Dean Rutila
Dean Rutila is a principal with Simpson Gumpertz & Heger, Inc.
 INTRODUCTION
Waterproofing the plaza deck is a critical task for a buried or partially buried building, often located at or near grade over commercial, office, museum and academic spaces. These palza are commonly at the perimiter of a main building, and may have pedestrian and vehicle traffic, planters, landscaping and water features. The plaza roofs on these buried buildings provide attractive landscaped and paved public places, reduce the apparent mass of a building, and limit visual conflicts with existing architecture. But the construction cost and the risk of premature leakage are much greater than with conventional roofing. Plaza systems also iclude terrace roof decks at higher elevations on buildings and parking garage roof decks. Most plaza waterproofing systems include insulation over conditioned interiors, although plazas over parking garages are often uninsulated.  
In many ways, this summary of plaza waterproofing is an old story. Several times each year we are asked to look at another plaza with a history of leakage. We find that there have been past repairs and unsuccessful reconstruction attempts and continued leakage. After years of “getting by” with interior gutters and buckets, the owner is tired of the leaks and wants it fixed. Some of these plazas have been leaking for their entire 30 years. Some are recently built. Each time, we find one or more of the following:
READ ALL OF DEAN’s ARTICLE  BY CLICKING ON THE TITLE ABOVE.

THE CHALLENGES OF RETROFIT PLAZA DECK WATERPROOFING

By Gary W Whittemore
Gary W. Whittemore, CDT, has been with Sarnafil Roofing
and Waterproofing Systems for five years. He currently serves
as the product manager for the U.S. waterproofing division
based in Sarnafil’s corporate office in Canton, MA. Prior to
this position, he was the national retail and strategic
accounts manager for the roofing division. Before joining
Sarnafil, Whittemore held various waterproofing sales and
product management positions during a 20-year career at W.
R. Grace & Co.

Creating a leak-free building is one of the greatest challenges
in our industry. Fixing leaks after the fact is even more challenging, especially on plaza decks. Plaza decks incorporate extensive overburden
systems, depending on their use. If there is a leak, the waterproofing membrane may be buried under tons of reinforced concrete,
heavy pavers or pavement, soil, and plantings. The removal and replacement of such overburdens represent a significant cost to the building owner.
Even the most successful waterproofing systems require maintenance or replacement
at some point during the life cycle of the building. A waterproofing system is made up of multiple components, and the failure of one component can lead to the failure
of the entire system. The fix is expensive
– many times more than the original cost. The situation is further compounded because the building is likely to be occupied and in use at the time of the repair.

READ  GARY’S WHOLE ARTICLE BY CLICKING ON THE TITLE ABOVE.

By Colin Meneely
Colin Meneely is a Project Manager with Structural Preservation Systems Florida East Branch in Pompano Beach, Fla.
A typical plaza deck restoration project consists of the following major work items: topping slab, and planter removal, waterproofing removal/deck preparation, concrete/pool restoration, deck/planter drain and plumbing installation, building planter walls, irrigation/electrical system installation, planter/deck waterproofing, paver installation, landscaping/amenity installation, painting and punchout. 
READ ALL OF COLIN’S ARTICLE BY CLICKING ON THE TITLE ABOVE.
By Daniel Perez
Daniel Perez is a concrete restoration and waterproofing specialist for All-State Products Inc in Miami Fla. For more information visitwww.aspfla.com
 Whether underneath paver, a garden roof, or inside planters, a high build waterproofing system is critical to the protection of structural components and occupied building areas. As an owner or property manager, you may only be interested in the end result and not the application type, but there are many things to consider before making the final decision.  
READ ALL OF DANIEL’S ARTICLE BY CLICKING ON THE TITLE ABOVE.

 

Waterproof decorative pedestrian decking systems beats wood & composite in looks, maintenance, costs & lifespan.