Tag Archives: deck building

Coming Soon! DeckExpert.com Best Practices Video Series!

We’ll be doing quick 3 to 4 minute videos on best practices for Waterproofing decks.

Y’all ready for this? Our new 3 to 4 minute video series will focus on best practices building and waterproofing decks over living spaces. I’ll be talking about framing, sloping, sheathing, flashing, drains and much more! Watch for our posts coming soon.

We’re Growing Again! Two New Page’s Added to Our Site!

We’ve added two new pages to our site recently!

Our first new page is a collaboration with North America Deck & Railing Association  and it allows visitors to DeckExpert.com to find deck inspectors that have passed NADRA’s Deck Inspection Training. You’ll go to NADRA’s page when you click on their links.

Click here to find a deck inspector in the US & Canada. 

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The second page we’ve recently added is for online web based courses on decks NADRA has an agreement with the Building Code College for you to either audit four courses on deck building, or to sign up and become a certified decking expert. The first version is free and we encourage everyone to audit the courses, Glen Mathewson, a recognized deck expert on building codes, wrote most if not all of the material. If you build/frame decks, this knowledge is very important. Take the time to take advantage of these educational opportunities and lets work towards making decks as safe as they can be.

Click here to start your way to becoming code proficient.

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Exterior Elevated Elements Working Group Agenda for 5/25/17 is Announced

 

9e0e3-0216001100The deck waterproofing industry needs to speak up!

From the California Building Standards Commission-

Notice is hereby given that the California Building Standards Commission (CBSC), Exterior Elevated Element (EEE) Subcommittee will solicit technical expertise on the items listed in the attached agenda and the link below.  The public is invited to attend and provide their input or comments.  For questions on this notice, please contact CBSC at (916) 263-0916.

http://www.bsc.ca.gov/calendar/othermtgs.aspx Website www.bsc.ca.gov

 

Continue reading Exterior Elevated Elements Working Group Agenda for 5/25/17 is Announced

A Reader Asks About Hot Mop For Waterproofing a Deck

DeckExpert.com answers your questions about deck waterproofing methods and materials for only $25.00.

“I am building a new roof deck as part of a full house remodel and I found you when researching my waterproofing options. My builder is suggesting hot mop, but I am not sure it is an appropriate option for a deck. The deck is on the plywood substrate and will not be heavily used (it is primarily there due to city’s set back requirement), but I still want to make sure that it can withstand light use. We are planning to install modular deck tiles on top of the decking surface.” Marat B San Francisco CA

Hello Marat,

Thanks for writing; you’re wise to have done some research and raise doubts about “hot mop” for waterproofing a roof deck.

Today’s modern deck waterproofing systems from our manufacturer’s provide all in one solutions to your waterproofing dilemma. The decking/roofing systems under Division 7 Pedestrian Walking Decks are all tough durable membranes that can be finished to look like wood, tile, stone etc.

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Alternatively, if you want a wood deck on pedestals above a waterproof surface, walking deck systems are still your best choice. The coatings can be installed and then pedestals can be placed on top of the waterproofing and a deck system built on top. With this method you should allow for being able to remove the decking to clean the waterproof surface periodically of debris. Extra slope over the minimum code required 1/4″ per foot may help flush debris off. I would suggest draining off roof edges rather than roof deck drains (ThunderbirdProducts.com) as debris may clog drains at the worst possible time. If you opt for drains, use a minimum of a 3″ drain and 3″ ABS pipe.

If you review our site, you’ll find lots of information and advice that should be useful in your quest. Make sure to read, understand and meet all requirements for a waterproof deck system and always use Best Practices to go over and above code which is just a bare minimum. For instance, use 1 1/8″ plywood over the minimum 5/8″.

Good luck with your project, Bill Leys The Deck Expert

Opinion – The California State License Board (CSLB) Has a License Classification Problem For Deck Waterproofing

Multiple Classifications of Contractors Can Waterproof Decks, But Few Have to Pass a Written Proficiency Test

D-12 Synthetic Products Classification Doesn’t Require a Proficiency Test

Manufacturer’s Accept D-12 License’s to Become Authorized Applicators

If you want to be a general contractor, plumber, electrician, earth mover, well driller, roofer.. CSLB requires you to have 3 years certifiable experience in that trade, plus take a legal exam on CSLB and state contracting laws AND pass a 3 hour test on your proficiency in that trade. You have to prove you know what your doing before they give you a license to do it. There’s a risk to consumers from people who don’t know what their doing. CSLB goes out of their way to run sting operations on unlicensed contractors, running press releases and posting hidden videos of their stings.

However, if you want to be a contractor that installs waterproofing for foundation walls and decks, decks like say the balcony in Berkeley, you don’t need a license that has a test that proves you have some knowledge; you can obtain a D-12 Synthetic Products license like this author has. A D-12 Synthetic products contractor does not have to pass a written test of proficiency in the subject of waterproofing! You just need to apply for it if your licensed in another trade and add it to your classifications and start waterproofing decks and foundations as most of the deck manufacturer’s accept the D-12 classification to sell and install their products.

How do I know this? Because I have/had a D12 license classification with which I used it to waterproof decks and balconies. But I’m not the only one, there are many contractors out there waterproofing decks using a D12, as well as using a C8 (concrete) or a C33 painting license improperly apparently, and CSLB seems to have a lassez faire attitude about this issue.

Will CSLB change the licensing requirements for becoming a deck waterproofing contractor?

Continue reading Opinion – The California State License Board (CSLB) Has a License Classification Problem For Deck Waterproofing